No Space Left on Device – ESXi Patching

Encountered a new error that I have not seen before working with ESXi 6.5.  I was upgrading from the base VMUG ESXi 6.5 image to the latest patched and received the following error

[InstallationError]
[Errno 28] No space left on device
vibs = VMware_locker_tools-light_6.5.0-1.33.7273056
Please refer to the log file for more details.

The datastore had plenty of space left, over fifty gigabytes.  The fix is rather simple, but intuitive, enable Swap on a Datastore.  Simply set the Datastore attribute to one of your datastores and try the upgrade again.

Update Result
Message: The update completed successfully, but the system needs to be reboot ed for the changes to be effective.
Reboot Required: true

Hopefully this saves some people some time and aggravation searching around for answers.

Advertisements

How to add a Content Library to vSphere

Log into your vSphere Web Client and click Menu – Content Library.

Capture.PNG

Click the plus sign to add a new Content Library

Capture.PNG

Add a Name and Location

Capture.PNG

Select a Local Content Library if you wish to upload ISOs, OVAs, and other templates.

Capture.PNG

Select your storage location, I use my local Freenas NFS Store.

Capture.PNG

Click Finish and your new Library will appear.  Capture.PNG

To add items, click on the Name of the Content Library, then select Actions and Import Item.

Capture.PNG

Select the item and click OK.

Capture.PNG

vSphere will then proceed to upload the item.

Once uploaded items like ISOs can be selected on the create VM Screens.

 

VMWare ESXi Passthrough and Freenas

I recently had user colicstew comment that they could not get Freenas 9.10.2 U3 to see drives on his LSI2116.  Luckily I have some unused 2TB Drives and LSI 2116 Controller as part of my Xeon D Lab.

IMG_0561.jpgIMG_0560.jpg

First step was to passthrough my LSI2116 Controller and Reboot the Server.  You should see Enabled/Active for the LSI Controller which we do

Snip20170511_1.png

Next I created a VM. Snip20170511_2.png

I chose to install the OS on one of my VMware Datastores.

Snip20170511_3.png

On the Hardware Settings I set as shown.

Snip20170511_4.png

Then I clicked Add other device -> PCI Device and Add the LSI ControllerSnip20170511_5.png

Finally I added a CD-ROM Drive and attached the Freenas ISO downloaded from here.

Snip20170511_7.png

Snip20170511_8.png

Finally we boot the VM

Snip20170511_9.png

Then we select Install at the first Screen

Snip20170511_13.png

One of the oddities I ran into while creating this tutorial was the key sequence to release the mouse from the VMWare Remote Console was the escape key in the Freenas installer that bounces you back to Initial Setup Screen, so the remaining pictures are via my phone.

On the next screen you will be warned about only having 4GB of memory.  Since I’m only using this as a test system, I am not concerned.  If you were running this as an actual file server you would want at a minimum 1GB of Memory per TB of storage.

IMG_0562.jpgOn the this screen we see five drives.  One is our drive we will install FreeNAS OS to, and the other four are 2TB Hitachi Drives I attached to the Xeon D Board.

IMG_0563.jpg

Next you are warned that FreeNAS will clear the drive you are installing to.

IMG_0564.jpg

Next you are asked to set the root password.

IMG_0565.jpg

Finally you are asked to choose a BIOS Mode.  

IMG_0566.jpg

At this point, I went to install the system, but no matter what I did, it would not install the OS, failing with the below error.

Snip20170511_15.png

The problem here is that the drive that we are installing the OS to is thin provisioned.  FreeNAS does not like this.

Snip20170511_16.png

Fix is to create the disk as “Thick provisioned, eagerly zeroed”.

Snip20170511_17.png

Once that was fixed, the OS installation continued without issue.

Snip20170511_18.png

Once completed, you will see the following success message.Snip20170511_19.png

Then, I chose option four to shutdown the system.  Be sure to remove the DVD Drive, or the system will continue to boot from the Installer.  Once that is completed your system will work as expected.

Snip20170511_23.png

Unfortunately, I had no issues getting the system up and running.  colicstew feel free to email me via the contact method and we can see about troubleshooting this issue.  I would start with verifying you have the correct breakout cable.  I used one of the four breakout cables from the Motherboard.

 

How to Setup Swap in ESXi 6.5

Another VMware basics post and this time I will teach you how to set up Swap for an ESXi Host.  The Swap here is for the VMKernel, and basically can create performance boost for those hosts that are heavily utilized.  For myself, I created a RAID 1 Volume of two Intel DC3710 800GB SSDs to for this.

The steps to do this are easy.  First create a datastore on your volume of choice.  It is best to use a low latency SSD that is local to the hosts.

Then we go to Host-> Manager and under the System Tab select Swap.

Snip20170417_9.png

Then we click Edit Settings, and change the Data Store to the one we just created.

Snip20170417_10.png

That’s it, now we have the Cache there.

If we browse to the DataStore we can see there is a swap file created.

Snip20170417_11.png

Cannot Create Datastore on VMware ESXi 6.5

I have been in the process of rebuilding my Plex Server and restoring the data.  I popped in four 4TB WD Red NAS Drives and attached them to my 12G Controller.  I figured it would be easy to create a datastore across the Raid 5 Drive and contine on my way.   Unfortunately that was not the case, and I kept recieving errors similar to the one seen below.

Snip20170417_1.pngWhile rather annoying, what I believe happens is that the Drives had a previous partition on them that ESXi just can not read or write to.  So what we have to do is do some configuration in the ESXi Shell.

First we need to enable SSH on this host, which is very simple.  At the Host Tab, click Actions -> Services – Enable Secure Shell (SSH).  ESXi will enable the service and pop up a reminder warning for you.

Snip20170417_2.png

Next we SSH into our ESXi Host.

Snip20170417_3.png

We then need to determine the Disk ID of the Device we wish to fix.  For us this is easy, as ESXi appends this to the name of the Device under Storage ->Devices. Snip20170417_4.png

From there we go back to the Shell and cd to /dev/disks where we should see a bunch of disk IDs.

Snip20170417_5.png

Then we run partedUtil mklabel /dev/disks/diskid msdos

Snip20170417_6.png

Then we run through the steps to create the new Datastore and after a bit of a wait we should see the new Datastore created.

Snip20170417_8.png

So there we have it, we have our Plex Datastore and I can create my new disk and start sharing my Media much to my fiancee’s enjoyment.   She has really missed her Power Rangers.  Also don’t forget to turn off SSH access for safety’s sake.